Skip to content

Rumbalara Reserve

Today I had the opportunity to revisit my adventure from last week, a series of walks around the top of Rumbalara Reserve behind Gosford. Combining the Ironbark, Flannel Flower and Casuarina trails gives you the opportunity to spend two or three hours wandering the reserve and look out over the surrounding suburbs.

I drove my car to the Yaruga Picnic area and parked a short distance from the lookout. After looking at the trail map I set off following the Casuarina which for the first hundred meters is beautifully paved with sandstone pavers. After the pathway the track became a well trodden pathway, very well defined and easy to follow.

My objective for the day was to find and photograph the Rumbalara Statues. Back in 1987 these bronze statues were commissioned by Sara Lee Kitchens to commemorate the NSW Bicentenary.

Following the tracks around the top of the reserve was fairly easy walking. There are a few twists and turns and some gradients to negotiate but for the most part the way is pretty clear and they are very well signposted.

That said I did manage to miss a turn while I was wandering about with my camera and headed down a track that I later found out to be named the 1km challenge.

You will see in my photographs a series of sturdy steel staircases. These are the beginning of the 1km challenge which the ridge line below the main walk.

It took me a good half a kilometre after I reached the bottom of the stairs to realise that I was heading the wrong way so I turned around and headed back. Those stairs are a lot easier on the way down. On the way back up I was passed by a man who I have to admit was a lot fitter than me. He was jogging! My heart was pounding in my chest and this guy sailed passed my like it was a stroll in the park. He passed me again on his way back down and I was happy to see that he was sweating too.

I only found two of the statues on my walk. Mathew Flinders was standing at the entrance to the Nurrunga picnic area and Edward John Eyre is sitting by the track on the way around. I did find a plaque for Sir Charles Kingsford Smith but no statue. Perhaps he and Captain Charles Sturt were having the day off. I would like to get some photos of these two statues so if anyone who knows where they are can you please let me know? Thanks.

This is a great walk and provided you don’t miss a turn only takes a couple of hours. It was also the first time I took video with my new GoPro camera, probably why I missed the turn. Take a look at the video on our YouTube channel and give us a like, there is some great footage of the walk and the statues.

———————
Combining the Ironbark, Flannel Flower and Casuarina trails gives you the opportunity to spend two or three hours wandering the reserve and look out over the surrounding suburbs.

—————————————

A sculpture commemorates explorer Matthew Flinders.
Matthew Flinders, was amongst the most accomplished navigators and chart-makers of any age. In 1798 he sailed south from Sydney in the sloop Norfolk, passed through Bass Strait and circumnavigated Van Diemens Land (Tasmania), thus proving it to be an island. From 1801 to 1803 he circumnavigated mainland Australia in HMS Investigator.
The monument was commissioned by Sara Lee Kitchens (Australia) Pty Ltd and Gosford City Council for the State Bicentennial celebration in 1987.

A sculpture commemorates explorer Edward John Eyre.
Edward John Eyre (1815 – 1901) was an English land explorer of the Australian continent, colonial administrator, and a controversial Governor of Jamaica.
Eyre set out to explore the interior of South Australia, with two separate expeditions north to the Flinders Ranges and west to beyond Ceduna. Eyre, together with his Aboriginal companion Wylie, was the first European to traverse the coastline of the Great Australian Bight and the Nullarbor Plain by land in 1840-1841, on an almost 2000 mile trip to Albany, Western Australia.
The monument was commissioned by Sara Lee Kitchens (Australia) Pty Ltd and Gosford City Council for the State Bicentennial celebration in 1987.

A sculpture commemorates explorer Captain Charles Sturt.
Charles Napier Sturt (28 April 1795 – 16 June 1869) was a British explorer of Australia, and part of the European exploration of Australia. He led several expeditions into the interior of the continent, starting from both Sydney and later from Adelaide. His expeditions traced several of the westward-flowing rivers, establishing that they all merged into the Murray River. He was searching to determine if there was an “inland sea”.
The monument was commissioned by Sara Lee Kitchens (Australia) Pty Ltd and Gosford City Council for the State Bicentennial celebration in 1987.

Aviator Sir Charles Kingsford Smith

Spread the love